The Best Baby Picture Ever of a Planetary System

The Best Baby Picture Ever of a Planetary System

Astronomers have taken the best picture yet of a planetary system being born. The image, taken by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the high-altitude desert in Chile, reveals a planet-forming disk of gas around a young, sun-like star, in great detail.

The post The Best Baby Picture Ever of a Planetary System appeared first on WIRED.




How Gravity Explains Why Time Never Runs Backward

How Gravity Explains Why Time Never Runs Backward

We can’t avoid the passing of time, even at the DMV, where time seems to come to a standstill. And daylight savings notwithstanding, time always ticks forward. But why not backward? For a group of physicists, the answers to these deep and complex questions may arise from a familiar source: gravity.

The post How Gravity Explains Why Time Never Runs Backward appeared first on WIRED.




Why It Took 23 Years to Link Amelia Earhart’s Disappearance to This Scrap of Metal

Why It Took 23 Years to Link Amelia Earhart’s Disappearance to This Scrap of Metal

Researchers had tried for 23 years to connect this piece of metal to Amelia Earhart’s disappearance. They finally think they’ve proven it was part of her plane.

The post Why It Took 23 Years to Link Amelia Earhart’s Disappearance to This Scrap of Metal appeared first on WIRED.




What Science Lost in the Antares Rocket Explosion

What Science Lost in the Antares Rocket Explosion

Last night, an unmanned Antares rocket carrying more than 5,000 pounds of cargo to the International Space Station exploded in a huge fireball seconds after liftoff. No one was hurt, but in addition to damage to the launch pad, NASA lost tons of supplies, including equipment and food for astronauts. Science also took a big hit in the explosion.

The post What Science Lost in the Antares Rocket Explosion appeared first on WIRED.




Tonight: Watch Live as a Total Lunar Eclipse Turns the Moon Red

Tonight: Watch Live as a Total Lunar Eclipse Turns the Moon Red

Early tomorrow morning, the moon will pass behind the center of Earth’s shadow and turn a rusty red color. Most people probably won’t be able to see this total lunar eclipse, because it will occur mainly over the Pacific Ocean. But don’t worry. You can watch a live broadcast by the Slooh Community Observatory from multiple locations in Australia and North America (above), or NASA’s broadcast of the event (below).

The post Tonight: Watch Live as a Total Lunar Eclipse Turns the Moon Red appeared first on WIRED.




NASA Taps Boeing, SpaceX to Transport Astronauts to Space Station

NASA Taps Boeing, SpaceX to Transport Astronauts to Space Station

In the latest step toward commercial human space flight, Boeing and SpaceX have been chosen to carry the next NASA astronauts into space, the agency announced today. NASA awarded $4.2 billion to Boeing and $2.6 billion to SpaceX to send astronauts to the International Space Station and return them safely home, with the goal of meeting all […]

The post NASA Taps Boeing, SpaceX to Transport Astronauts to Space Station appeared first on WIRED.